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Wednesday, July 23, 2014

Mr. W Fireworks



 I.T. Hit with Satellite
Check It Out

This guy? AKA Wilson is a Sick Puppy 
Location of Anubis January 2009
My Dog Thai Was Poisoned 



From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
For other uses, see Anubis (disambiguation).
Anubis
Protector of the dead and embalming[1]
Anubis standing.svg
The Egyptian god Anubis (a modern rendition inspired by New Kingdom tomb paintings)
Anubis (/əˈnuːbəs/ or /əˈnjuːbəs/;[2] Ancient Greek: Ἄνουβις) is the Greek name of a jackal-headed god associated with mummification and the afterlife in ancient Egyptian religion.
Like many ancient Egyptian deities, Anubis assumed different roles in various contexts. Depicted as a protector of graves as early as the First Dynasty (c. 3100 – c. 2890 BC), Anubis was also an embalmer. By the Middle Kingdom (c. 2055 – 1650 BC), Anubis was replaced by Osiris in his role as Lord of the underworld. One of his prominent roles was as a god who ushered souls into the afterlife. He attended the weighing scale during the "Weighing of the Heart," in which it was determined whether a soul would be allowed to enter the realm of the dead.[3] Despite being one of the most ancient and "one of the most frequently depicted and mentioned gods" in the Egyptian pantheon, however, Anubis played almost no role in Egyptian myths.[4]
Anubis was depicted in black, a color that symbolized both rebirth and the discoloration of the corpse after embalming. Anubis is associated with Wepwawet (also called Upuaut), another Egyptian god portrayed with a dog's head or in canine form, but with grey or white fur. Historians assume that the two figures were eventually combined.[5] Anubis' female counterpart is Anput. His daughter is the serpent goddess Kebechet.

Donate to wikipedia a good source for what most people believe to be true: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Anubis